Videos

Click on these links to find mini video tutorials and videos of some of my weaving teachers at work:

Montagnard backstrap weaver, Ju Nie, and a backstrap weaver from the Cusco region in Peru show how they load weft yarn onto sticks that they use as shuttles (embedded in post).

loading a stick shuttle cusco peruA weaver from Chahuaytire, Peru creates pattern with supplementary warps using a backstrap loom (embedded in post)

chahuaytire backstrap weaving

Montagnard weaver Ju Nie shows how she twists the fringe at the ends of her woven pieces (embedded in post)

ScreenHunter_001

A backstrap weaver in Peru uses a forked stick in her warp to help open the heddle shed (embedded in post)

Usig a forked stick in the warpDeb McClintock’s demonstration and explanation of the vertical pattern storge system used on looms in Laos (embedded in post)

deb mcclintock adapted pattern storage system

Cotton spinning Chiclayo, Peru (embedded in post).

cotton spinning Chiclayo Peru

1.Weaving a complementary-warp belt, San Ignacio de Loyola, Peru with 24 sets of string heddles (embedded in post).

2. Making string heddles in San Ignaco de Loyola (embedded in post)

Twenty-four heddle sticks are used to weave the traditional pattern on the "faja sara" of San Ignacio de Loyola.

Twenty-four heddle sticks are used to weave the traditional pattern on the “faja sara” of San Ignacio de Loyola.

 Knotting the fringe of a traditional ikat pañon of Tacabamba, Peru (embedded in post).

A weaver of panones of Tacabamba, Peru, puts the finshing touch on hher woven ikat shawl by knotting an intricate pattern into the the fringe.

A weaver of panones of Tacabamba, Peru, puts the finshing touch on her woven ikat shawl by knotting an intricate pattern into the the fringe.

Weaving a pañon, Tacabamba, Peru.

A few final adjustments are made before weaving can begin. Then Nila asked the crowd to give her more room and we all understood why when she raised the very long sword and shuttle to be placed within the sheds.

A few final adjustments are made before weaving can begin. Then Nila asked the crowd to give her more room and we all understood why when she raised the very long sword and shuttle to be placed within the sheds.

A Burmese backstrap weaver weaving supplementary weft patterns (embedded in the post)

Montagnard Backstrap Weaver Ju Nie shows how she creates continuous string heddles while she winds her warp. (embedded in post)

My “slowed down” demo and explanation of how Montagnard weavers add string heddles as they warp on my Youtube channel:

adding string heddles while warping

Basic weft twining (embedded in post)

Opening the shed rod shed on a sticky warp (embedded in post)


Bolivian Weavers doing Complementary Warp Pick-up (embedded in blog post along with a video on the basics of complementary warp pick-up)

A Weaver at work from Cochabamba, Bolivia

Three videos embedded in one blog post:

Overspinning plied wool yarn

Warping and prep for weaving pick-up on a simple toe loom

Weaving pebble weave on a simple toe loom

Weavers of South America – a Mapuche weaver from central Chile

Embedded, or Two-weft Double Weave

Sling braiding – The Palma Braid

Braiding – The 4-Strand Braid on Finger Loops

Warping and Setting up the Loom

Techniques – Simple Warp Floats

Techniques – One-weft Double Weave

Weavers of South America – Candelaria and Tarabuco, Bolivia

Five-strand Finger Loop Square Braid

Four-stake warping

Guatemalan single face supplementary weft patterning – setting up the patterning sticks

Opening the heddle shed

Weavers of South America – Zapote, Manabi Province, Ecuador

Weavers of South America – Pitumarca, Peru

Weavers of South America – A Guarani weaver in Santa Cruz, Bolivia warping and making string heddles.

Weavers of South America – a Guarani weaver in Santa Cruz, Bolivia weaving Moisy technique.

Ju Nie, Montagnard weaver, spins cotton on a traditional spinning wheel.(embedded in  post)

Ngach Rahlan, Montagnard weaver, making a weft twined design on the edge of a traditional skirt. (embedded in post)

Ju Nie, Montagnard weaver, shows how she prepares cotton for spinning and then skeins it. (embedded in post)

Four videos embedded in one post:

Weavers from Peru and Bolivia doing pick up;

Weavers from Peru and Bolivia weaving and attaching edge bands and braiding;

Spinners from the Cusco area of Peru;

A young boy learning to weave with his grandmother;.

Creating third and fourth selvedges in Chinchero

Weaving and attaching a tubular plain weave band to fabric


Opening the heddles on a narrow warp

Needle-weaving to close the gap on a four-selvedge piece (embedded in this post)

Responses

  1. Good luck with the job training Jeannine. I am glad you are still able to keep up with things online. It is always nice to see you here and at Weavolution.

  2. Very impressive! Saw and viewed your article on weavezine. I think South American weaving is some of the best in the world. Thank you for sharing.

  3. Estoy Fasinada ,viendo sus trabajos .GRACIAS POR COMPARTIR.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,334 other followers

%d bloggers like this: