Tutorial- Warp Floats Galore – “S” design on a yurt band border.

This tutorial assumes that you are competent in setting up a warp for and weaving simple warp floats – instructions and tutorials on this are here.

This is a more complex technique as you will be creating floats in both the colors in your warp. I recommend referring to the tutorial in this post and weaving the border design with two-color overlapping floats before attempting this one.

The “S” shaped design is from the border of a yurt band which I wove onto a cell phone pouch recently.

To photograph the instructions for this tutorial, I wove the border design using 12wpi cotton. It produces a very thick and not particularly attractive band but it shows up well in the instructional photos.

Using a third color for the border is optional. In the cell phone pouch above, I didn’t.

You need to set up a warp that looks like this. There are four ends in each of the tan borders. You can count fouteen black warps and fourteen whites. As the warps are always floated in pairs, it is best to think of the set-up as being seven pairs of black warps and seven pairs of white. The warps in shed 2 will be controlled by a shed stick and those in shed 1 will go into heddles. The black warps in shed 1 will form the background for the white motif. (oops! just noticed that my cross is imperfect in the picture...one white fell off the upper cross stick!)

Make a few weft passes through sheds 1 and 2 weaving horizontal stripes to get started. I am passing my weft from left to right through shed 2 and I suggest you do the same to be in sync with these instructions.  I am using the white warps in shed 2 to form the motif and the black warps in shed 1 to form the background. I will start floating warps after having woven a stripe in my chosen motif color, white. Open the white shed, beat and pass the weft.

The chart for the "S" design

There are two basic sequences involved:

  1. Floating white warps over a black stripe to form the motif;
  2. Floating  black warps over a white stripe to form the background.

After having passed my weft through shed 2 and woven a white stripe I proceed with sequence 1…

LEFT: Select the white warps from shed 2 that are going to float. RIGHT: Add these to all the warps in shed 1, beat and pass the weft from right to left.

The first weft pass detailed above is shown on this chart. The white dots mark the white warps that are selected to float. All the rows that are marked with green dots on the chart involve the same sequence of moves, that is, selecting the white warps from shed 2 that are going to float, adding them to all the warps in shed 1 and passing the weft from right to left. I have only marked the warps with white dots in the first couple of weft passes. It is up to you to mark the others!

Sequence 2 looks like this…

LEFT: Select the black warps from shed 1 that are going to float. RIGHT: Add them to all the warps from shed 2 beat and pass the weft from left to right.

The second weft pass detailed above is shown on this chart. The black dots mark the black warps that are selected to float. All the rows that are marked with red dots on the chart involve the same sequence of moves, that is, selecting the black warps from shed 1 that are going to float, adding them all to the warps in shed 2 and passing the weft from left to right. I have only marked the warps with black dots for the first couple of weft passes. It is up to you to mark the others!

I wove two columns of mirrored "S" designs on this belt.

I hope you find this tutorial useful and can use this beautiful Central Asian motif in one of your projects. Perhaps trying this will motivate you to chart and weave some designs of your own. :-)


Responses

  1. Thanks, Laverne! Will try this next. Your tutorials are wonderful. I have not seen anything in any books that comes close.


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